UD3: The Future of the Smart Precinct

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Paul Edwards, General Manager at Mirvac who will present on ‘UD3: The Future of the Smart Precinct’.

Abstract

Smart precincts are digitally enabled, mixed-use urban districts that combine the latest technologies and smart services with new property and place-making strategies. From London and New York to Sydney and Seoul, they are emerging from the ground to form the essential building blocks of the future smart city.

In a new discussion paper, The Future of the Smart Precinct, Mirvac and UNWORK explore the smart precinct in the context of city innovation and regeneration, looking at:
• The physical–digital mix of the smart precinct
• How smart precincts are renegotiating 
the web of relationships between city authorities, citizens, businesses, employees
• How a balance can be achieved between preserving the human experience and the influx of new technology

In his presentation, Paul will discuss the current debate and thinking about smart buildings and cities, positioning the smart precinct as a key focus of urban development and innovation.

He will discuss concepts including “The New Bargain” and “Creative Citizenship”, positioning smart precincts as giant testbeds for urban innovation, where data is shared freely between all community participants, underpinned by the concept that there is shared value in data exchange.

He will also discuss how in all areas of development, a new bargain or balance must be struck
to ensure the human and digital elements
of the smart precinct can be harmonized, looking at:
– Reskilling the human workforce in the face of automation
– How technology will serve a human-centric urbanism
– Tech-enabled ‘collectives of intimacy’ allowing people to take on reciprocal roles in a community

Paul will showcase international and local case studies, while outlining the key challenges that face the smart precinct. More specifically, he will look at how the principles of a smart precinct have been applied at South Eveleigh, Mirvac’s new innovation and technology precinct in Sydney.

Biography

As General Manager of Workplace Experiences for Mirvac, Paul Edwards works to define and shape what the future of workspace and office development will look like for Mirvac, it’s customers and the greater property industry. His role centres on partnerships, relationships and knowledge creation across all elements of property including placemaking, smart technology, design, sustainability, health, wellbeing, brand, culture, community and mobility. With over 20 years’ experience in the property space, Paul is responsible for helping Mirvac set a new group workplace strategy through the development of a knowledge bank on the future of workplace. Mirvac will use this to help improve new and existing development projects and assets across Australia.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

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UD2: What Stops Urbanism, and Why the Design Profession Needs a New Approach

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Ms. Tanya Vincent, Principal Manager Urban Design with Transport for NSW who will present on ‘UD2: What Stops Urbanism, and Why the Design Profession Needs a New Approach’.

Abstract

Every design report, masterplan and planning strategy promises a contextual, humanist urbanism with design excellence, yet something always seems to happen between the paper and the product. If the theory, principles and masterplans are in place, what is really stopping urbanism?

This article is about the production of streets, places, infrastructure and subdivision. It explores how the atelier model of architecture is unsuited to the industrialised, compliance processes behind the design and delivery of urban design and too often fails to deliver the principles promised.

The article charts the project arc from the vision to the outcome against the waning influence of principles and the dominating power of rules. Examples demonstrate how the focus on principles is no match to the accretion of rules over decades and the rigorous enforcement by multiple agencies.

The design profession’s strategies to address this imbalance are evaluated: educating the industry with design guidelines, codifying principles (e.g. sustainability, crime prevention) and design review panels. The first two strategies are found to be weak; in particular the idea that enlightened individuals will overcome the systemic barriers. Guidelines without a genuine policy change are found to rely on the weakest of policy mechanisms – inspiration and hope. The danger of codified principles (e.g. Movement and Place) intended to guide the design process evolving into prescriptive compliance tasks and reducing the creative space in which designers can be trusted to find the contextual, holistic solution is highlighted.

Alternative approaches are offered. Examples include a mechanism within the existing compliance system that values the contextual, holistic solution over the compliance of the parts, similar to the SFAIRP method in risk management; a focus on our own education of the industrialised procedures; and tackling the sub-urban regulations deep within the technical standards that stop urbanism.

Biography

Tanya Vincent is Transport for NSW Principal Manager Urban Design currently working on the Sydney Light Rail project. She explains the project as “12km of route equals 24km of urban design” and enjoys working with many talented professionals to balance the tensions between link and place through the city. She speaks frequently on urban issues, most recently the University of Sydney Alumni event on Urbanism and the Driverless Car at the Art Gallery of NSW.

Tanya’s experience in policy, projects and education bridges the disciplines of architecture, planning and urban design. Prior to joining Transport for NSW, Tanya was an Associate at JBA and previously the Urban Design Advisory Service. Recent urban design projects have included co-authorship of the Growth Centres Housing Diversity SEPP and DCP package, Landcom’s 21st Century Compact Housing initiative leading to NSW’s first display village of torrens title, attached housing at North Penrith, numerous master plans and industry publications such as Landcom’s Residential Density Guide, Better Residential Subdivision, and the UDAS Street Design Guidelines.

As a leading practitioner in neighbourhood design, Tanya was awarded a 2011 Churchill Fellowship. In 2015 she was awarded the Institute of Civil Engineers Outstanding Presentation of the Year.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

UD1: Lifestyle Alternative: The Rise of the Regional Town

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Ms Rebecca Finn, Principal at Tract who will present on ‘UD1: Lifestyle Alternative: The Rise of the Regional Town’.

Abstract

Melbourne’s population is expected to hit 5 million people within 3 years. It’s a 100-kilometre journey from the far south-eastern suburbs to the most western suburbs. Our love of single-family homes means that our cities are getting wider and wider, while infrastructure struggles to keep up. The pressures of population growth on the major Australian cities are significant.
Cue the regional city. As some people look to an alternative to life in the major capital cities, our regional cities offer charm, shorter commute times, and most importantly more affordable property. And while the growth of regional towns in Victoria is not yet keeping pace with the growth in Melbourne, these towns are experiencing faster growth than they have in many decades.

This presentation looks at current Tract projects in regional Victoria and how these beautiful towns and small cities are envisioning their futures. Actively encouraging growth without compromising charm and character is key to their success. These towns stand to gain much from increased population, so long as growth is ‘done well’ and in conjunction with improvements to services and infrastructure. Ballarat, Ararat, Wangaratta and Mansfield are four such towns. This presentation will highlight the journeys of each of these Councils and their communities, as they consider appropriate growth and how to leverage this growth to provide better amenities, employment options and services for their communities. More and more regional towns are providing an alternative lifestyle to that of our major cities. This is just the beginning.

Biography

Rebecca Finn is a Principal Urban Designer at Tract. She began her career as a Landscape Architect before completing a Masters of Urban Design at the University of California, Berkeley. Her career has focused primarily on the design of the public realm, and in particular streets, neighbourhoods and precincts. She has worked extensively with high calibre private and public sector clients both in Australia and overseas. After many years living and working in Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, she is now very happy to now call Melbourne home.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

UD2: Byron Bay Town Centre

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Ms Jo Kelly, Director at People, Place and Partnership who will present on ‘UD2: Byron Bay Town Centre – How to Implement a Comprehensive Masterplan for an Iconic Town Centre Talking Strategy to Action’.

Abstract

The Byron Bay Town Centre Masterplan is different. It is an integrated masterplan one that is based on the principles of comprehensive community engagement and a commitment to governance and implementation from the outset. This masterplan is not driven by the land developer’s opportunity sites, it is driven by a place focused assessment of future needs based around community catalyst sites.

Creating a masterplan for the iconic NSW tourist destination, Byron Bay which is visited annually by more than 1.4 million domestic and international tourists and is home to more than 30% of the Shire’s residents, approximately 8,500 people was always going to be a challenge. This masterplan was created around an ambitious commitment to work hand in hand with the community, to understand their aspirations for the future and create a framework that allowed for actions to be implemented incrementally.

Essential to the approach has been the understanding that town centres are constantly evolving and that masterplan strategies should show a commitment to establishing holistic, yet incremental responses to people’s needs.

This masterplan is created based on a 6-point vitality assessment that has community, implementation and governance at its core that takes a closer look at the Public domain, Access, Movement and Transportation,
Built Form and Aesthetics, Economic Development, Culture and Environmental Sustainability.

People, Place and Partnership worked alongside the lead designers McGregor Coxall to create a place making approach that allowed for community ownership, activation and community leadership to drive the masterplan delivery.

This presentation will share with you these insights on how to take the plan from idea to implementation from one of Australia’s most iconic destinations and follows the journey from the 2014 start, to what has been implemented as 2018 concludes.

Biography

Current Position – Director People Place and Partnership Pty Ltd Qualifications & Affiliations – Bachelor of Urban Planning (Hons), University of New England Expertise Areas • Strategic Planning • Place Planning • Masterplans • Place Making, Place Activation • Stakeholder communications and engagement • Community, stakeholder and technical facilitation Jo is a Director of People, Place and Partnership who has had an extensive and broad career in urban planning, master planning, large infrastructure projects and community development. For the last 20 years Jo has spent working on large scale masterplans to assist transition cities and key communities in renewal programs.

Jo has varied experience and has developed highly refined skills in facilitation, strategic thinking, project management and delivery. She is intent on looking for innovative solutions to problems and believes in delivering outputs and outcomes that are of an extremely high quality. With her diverse background in local and state government, private sector both in Australia and within Europe she brings a comprehensive insight to best practice and innovation in the tools and techniques applied in projects. Jo is an industry leader in engagement, strategic communications, governance and implementation frameworks.

She has developed strategic engagement and communication solutions efficiently and effectively that ensure successful delivery of high profile and at times contentious projects. Jo has been instrumental in the award-winning master planning projects for Parramatta City Centre, Bryon Bay Town Centre, Springwood Town Centre where she has worked alongside McGregor Coxall.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

UD1: The Happy City – Designing for Happiness

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Miss Sofie Pringle, Urban Designer & PhD Researcher with Peddle Thorp & Qut who will present on ‘UD1: The Happy City – Designing for Happiness’.

Abstract

Urbanisation and densification are some of the greatest challenges for humanity this century. Delivering density well is critical. There is opportunity within these contexts to revolutionise the way we plan and design our cities, and citizen happiness is key to this. In the highly dense and compact context, we look to develop best practice urban design standards and policy that advocates for better design quality, liveability, sustainability and community resilience. However, there is one crucial ingredient missing – designing for happiness.

Pilot research developed through QUT has explored urban design elements that people associate with their happiness. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used in the research project to identify features of urban environments around the world that people associated with happiness. These findings were tested through the pilot study conducted in Brisbane, which validated phase 1. Overall it found that there are linkages between particular urban design characteristics and the happiness of people in the urban environment. Some of which include colour, texture, materiality, water and other physical features within an urban context.

This pilot research highlights that design can enhance the happiness of users. Future urban and city design could be informed by ‘urban happiness’ principles that guide the creation of the happy city; one that is liveable and meets the needs of social sustainability.

We know that urban quality has been recognised as attracting great economic investment opportunity for cities. But has Australia considered the attractiveness of a happy city? In the age of globalisation, cities need to compete on difference and specialisation, designing for happiness could be this point of difference. The research contributes to improving urban design and guiding the design process to create happier, healthier places for people within cities. Density can be done well, if happiness is part of the equation.

Biography

Sofie Pringle is a designer at Peddle Thorp Architects and a PhD candidate undertaking research in urban happiness at Queensland University of Technology. Her research focuses on the relationships between density, happiness and urban design. Sofie has published research in the area of “urban happiness” which explores user happiness in urban settings, user perceptions, urban design (built and natural) characteristics that have an impact on user happiness.

From a design background, Sofie has a range of experience in master planning, residential, retail, mixed use and education projects at various scales of density. Sofie has the ability to extract, interpret and synthesize the client brief into a well-developed design that reflects end user needs for a long-term solution. She has a passion for creating environments that increase user happiness and improve quality of life, with long term strategies for growth.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au