Design Smart: Achieving High Quality Design Through Collaborative Processes

Mr Omar Barragan, Manager of Urban Design at Brisbane City Council will be attending this year’s International Urban Design Conference, discussing “Design smart: achieving high quality design through collaborative processes”.

As Brisbane grows as a New World City, the aim is to achieve a responsive subtropical design that speaks on behalf of the city – design that demonstrates the best elements of living in Subtropical Brisbane.

Omar Barragan

Brisbane needs exemplary projects that respond to an embrace our subtropical climate and showcase our city’s urban character and outdoor lifestyle. To achieve this strategic goal Brisbane City Council has created a new initiative that seeks ways to partner with the development industry and key stakeholders.

The Design SMART service is intended to be a pre-lodgement service from the initiation/inception phase of significant development projects. Council officers attend multiple pre-lodgment meetings and work with applicants to review the design opportunities and constraints of a site and to discuss how these might inform the development of the concept design for the site.

There are two key of differences in this process that set apart Brisbane’s approach to other cities. The first is the high level policy guidance provided by the recently adopted document, ‘ New World City Design Guide: Buildings that Breathe’. This forward thinking guide illustrates how residential and commercial buildings in the city centre, mixed use inner city, transport corridors and principal regional activity centres should be designed to respond to our subtropical climate and improve sustainability. This gives clarity to the industry on the expected three dimensional built outcomes for the city.

The second is the direct involvement from the initial stages of the city’s Independent Design Advisory Panel (IDAP). This panel provides Council with independent advice on design, quality, sustainability and appropriateness of strategies and projects of importance to Brisbane’s future growth. In this way, Design SMART facilitates direct feedback from industry-based professionals, real world advice, to developers from early stages of the design process.

The 10th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa, Gold Coast, Queensland from Monday 13 – Tuesday 14 November 2017. 

Secure your seat and register today!

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Connected Communities: Accessing High Speed Wifi, or Knowing Your Neighbours?

Ms Jessica Christiansen-Franks, Co-founder and CEO of Neighbourlytics will be at this year’s International Urban Design Conference this November, presenting “Connected communities: accessing high speed wifi, or knowing your neighbours?” 

Jessica Christiansen-Franks

We can’t deny that technology is having a transformative impact on cities. ‘Smart cities’ and ‘innovation districts’ are perhaps the new ‘sustainable’. But with much talk about autonomous vehicles and drones, is technology actually helping us to create better places?

One in three Australians don’t know their neighbours, and loneliness is now recognised as a leading cause of death ahead of heart disease, and also a major contributor to domestic violence. Our cities are in crisis, and we need to change our approach.

Urban designers have long heralded the value of the public realm in creating stronger communities. But with so many challenges facing Australian cities, how can we use technology to turbo-charge the design process? While community engagement can be an excellent tool, it can be time consuming, cost prohibitive, and distorted by the NIMBY effect.

But 71% of Australians are on Facebook, and as a nation we search Google 150 million times a month, and send 4 million snapchats every day. Neighbourlytics is a social analytics platform created to help city-makers tap into this data to understand the unique local identity of places.

We will share insights from some of our recent work with property developers and local government to get to the heart of what makes people feel connected to place, and how better data can lead to stronger, more relevant design outcomes.

This year the International Urban Design Conference offers optional tours available on Wednesday 15 November. These will include visiting two of the precincts that have been designed and built for the 2018 Commonwealth Games held on the Gold Coast in April 2018.

Find out more here.

 

Translating Policy to Place: Planning High Quality Precincts in the World’s Most Liveable City

The 10th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa, Gold Coast, Queensland from Monday 13 – Tuesday 14 November 2017.

Emily Mottram, Director of Urban Renewal at Victorian Planning Authority is a keynote speaker at this year’s Conference, presenting “Translating policy to place – planning high quality precincts in the world’s most liveable city”.

Emily Mottram

Melbourne trades on its legacy of good planning by the Victorians and its title of the world’s most liveable city. It is also experiencing record breaking population growth, economic restructuring and climate change. Infrastructure investment is reshaping and reframing the city as we know it.

There is a strong policy basis set out through Plan Melbourne 2017-2050 to focus 70% of residential growth into established areas. The Victorian Planning Authority is working in precincts across Melbourne to translate this policy intent into high quality place based outcomes. A key challenge is to achieve exemplary contextual design to ensure we have a social licence to act.

This presentation will use a series of case studies from inner and middle Melbourne to reflect upon the opportunities and evolving tools for precinct renewal.

This year the International Urban Design Conference offers optional tours available on Wednesday 15 November. These will include visiting two of the precincts that have been designed and built for the 2018 Commonwealth Games held on the Gold Coast in April 2018.

Find out more here.

Restart the Heart: Urban Surgery to Save City Life

Mr Dave Charnley, Urban Designer at Palmerston North City Council will be joining us at the 2017 International Urban Design Conference to discuss “Restart the heart: Urban surgery to save city life”

Issue:

The Square or Te Marae O Hine (the courtyard of the daughter of peace) in Palmerston North, NZ (Pop 85,000) is a 17 ha open space physically located at the heart of the city, closely held in the hearts and minds of residents and those who visit.

David Charnley

Central to early city life, the Square was where visitors arrived by train, commerce occurred and public events were held. As the city grew and transportation and retail models changed a weakening of the city heart occurred that by the early 2000’s little city life within the Square remained.

Key causes:

-Increased vehicle ownership
-Relocation of rail line to edge of the city
-City sprawl
-Large format retailing
-High concealment, difficult egress and poor quality of assets
-Space claim by groups – sense of fear and criminal activity

Intervention:

In 2004 Palmerston North City Council set about a series of catalytic design and strategy steps in an attempt to reclaim The Square, restart the city heart, and allow visible public life to once again flourish.

Key moves:

-City Heart Project – The Square 2004
Applied CPTED principles as key redevelopment driver

Urban Design Strategy 2010

8 Key initiatives to lift the quality of urban design across the city, in particular:
(a) Apply a centres based approach to city development
(b) Embed urban design criteria into the District Plan, in particular in the Business Zone
(c) ‘Placemaking’ encourage community led solutions to public realm occupation

Result:

-Improved sight lines, access and movement
-Increased high quality, usable space for people
-A safe destination a massive reduction in crime
-Increased official city events and place activation
-Increased visible public life
-Community led events and activation
-Launch of ‘Palmy Unleashed’ with design power shifting to community groups and PNCC now providing the wrap around support to make things happen
-Outside perception of city changing

The 10th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa, Gold Coast, Queensland from Monday 13 – Tuesday 14 November 2017. This year there are optional tours available on Wednesday 15 November. These will include visiting two of the precincts that have been designed and built for the 2018 Commonwealth Games held on the Gold Coast in April 2018.

Find out more here.

Preserving Urban Watercourses: An Affordable and Ecological Design Approach to Manage Urban Flash Floods

The 10th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Surfers Paradise Marriott Resort & Spa, Gold Coast, Queensland from Monday 13 – Tuesday 14 November 2017.

Ms Rumana Asad, PhD Student at the University of Newcastle will be at this year’s Conference, discussing “Preserving urban watercourses: an affordable and ecological design approach to manage urban flash floods”.

Rumana Asad

The growing awareness of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) confirms its acceptability due to environment friendly and locally preferred approaches. In the age of climate change, EbA entails adaptation strategies and processes that are grounded in the sustainable use of natural resources and ecosystem services often managed by local people and technology. Despite its potential the applications of EbA remain still limited, particularly in the realm of urban design and planning.

In favoring its applications EbA, recent literature attempts establish theoretical connections between ecological design and EbA while dispiriting hard engineering solutions, which seem to be expensive and have negative impacts on ecosystems. Thus for developing cities the use of EbA is particularly important and effective. The theoretical framework of this paper is grounded  on the connections thereby testing it through a case in developing cities. Such a city Khulna has been increasingly affected by flash floods over last decade due to heavy rain every year.

The study investigates the potential of local ecosystem and strategies of ecological design as well as landscape urbanism to reduce these impacts. Since multidisciplinary approaches “participatory and culturally appropriate” are widely recommended, this study employs interviews with local people and experts to identify urban design challenges and to appreciate ecological design integrated with EbA so as to enhance the resilience of urban infrastructure.

This study finds that Khulna’s planning policies focus more on physical planning offering piece-meal based and problem-based solutions only while disregarding incorporating the potentials of EbA.
Additionally, new infrastructure, which is often failed linking to urban watercourses and wetlands and thus increase the city’s imperviousness and surface runoff, thereby posing Khulna more vulnerable to flash flood.

Accordingly, this paper advocates for an interdisciplinary ecological design approach to bring nature back while preserving watercourses so as to increase the resilience of urban infrastructure.

The 2017 International Urban Design Conference is an opportunity for design professionals to exchange ideas and experiences, to be creative and visionary and to contribute to redesigning our urban futures.

Find out more here.