Introducing Dr Rajjan Chitrakar, Visiting fellow from The Queensland University of Technology.

The 9th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Hyatt Canberra from Monday 7 November to Wednesday 9 November 2016. This year we have presenters from 7 countries including Australia, China, Denmark, Hong Kong, New Zealand, United Kingdom and the United States.

Dr Rajjan Chitrakar, Visiting fellow from The Queensland University of Technology will present a discussion on ‘Urban growth, social change and transformation of urban neighbourhoods in Nepal’s Kathmandu Valley’.

Following the political change of 1951, Kathmandu Valley, the cultural, economic and political centre of Nepal, has undergone a significant level of both physical and social transformation. The valley has since then witnessed rapid growth of its traditional towns due to the huge influx of people from all over the country. One major consequence of the current urban growth is the changing socio-demographic pattern of contemporary urban neighbourhoods. Although the valley’s traditional neighbourhoods consist of a homogenous population, often belonging to clan relationship and also sharing many common features, the new neighbourhoods show a radical departure.

This paper examines the consequences of the current urban growth on socio-demographic transformation of new neighbourhoods through an assessment of socio-economic profile of households, social networking and neighbourhood organisation. The paper reports on findings from a case study of three new neighbourhoods in the valley, which have been developed over the period of past three decades. Data were collected from household surveys and interviews with the neighbourhood residents. Findings of the study reveal several contrasting features within the new neighbourhoods as compared to the traditional neighbourhoods. The new neighbourhoods are multiethnic and composed of newcomers and thus, the residents have been struggling to organise themselves in a community. The social networking is just beginning to take form, which is largely based on territorial propinquity. New forms of community-based organisations are also emerging in the changing social context. Yet, the formation of the community is slow and less effective in building social networks.

Dr Chitrakar has completed a PhD in Urban Planning from Queensland University of Technology and is now a Visiting Fellow. He has been a sessional academic at QUT since 2012.

For more information on the 9th International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot please visit the Conference Website.

 

 

Playing the long game: Completing the National Triangle

The 9th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Hyatt Canberra from Monday 7 November to Wednesday 9 November 2016. With presenters from 7 countries including Australia, China, Denmark, Hong Kong, New Zealand, United Kingdom and the United States, this is an industry event you do not want to miss!

Andrew Smith, Deputy Chief Executive and Chief Planner at the National Capital Authority will present a paper on ‘Playing the long game: Completing the National Triangle’.

In our increasingly urbanised society the provision of high quality urban design solutions is critical. In 2004 the National Capital Authority proposed that Walter Burley Griffin’s vision of Constitution Avenue as an elegant and vibrant mixed use boulevard be reinvigorated. An ambitious planning, design and capital works program followed. The NCA’s vision for Constitution Ave is being realised, construction of the public realm is completed, a large number of development proposals for sites flanking the Avenue are being developed, with a number of early projects now complete. This presentation will demonstrate the overwhelming benefits of long term strategic planning and an unwavering commitment to design quality.

Andrew Smith is currently employed as the Deputy Chief Executive and Chief Planner at the National Capital Authority. In this role Andrew has responsibility for NCA’s planning, design, design development, master planning, heritage, memorial and artwork functions.

He is a registered architect and planner with over 25 years’ experience in Australian and overseas in delivery of policy, planning, capital and maintenance projects of varying values, scales and complexities. His work includes building, landscape, commemorative, engineering and maintenance works.

For more information on the 9th International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot please visit the Conference Website.

Scholarships Available – 9th International Urban Design Conference

The 9th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Hyatt Canberra from Monday 7 November to Wednesday 9 November 2016. Wednesday 9 being optional tours.

There are a limited number of scholarships available to attend conference; the following individuals are eligible to apply for a conference scholarship:

  • Full Time Students
  • Retirees/Unwaged
  • International Delegates

Applications for scholarships must be submitted by COB Friday 7 October 2016 HERE.

The conference program includes 9 keynote presenters, 80 stream and forum presenters, an Expert Panel discussion, along with two optional walking tours. Early Bird registration for the Conference will closes today, Monday 26 September 2016; registration by this date will secure you a $100 discount.

2016 Program Topics Include:

  • How to make a city smart?
  • Sustainability in a smart city
  • Urban design innovation for smart cities
  • City Infrastructure
  • Urban design opportunities in high density living areas
  • Mixing up residential and commercial uses  in inner cities
  • Population change and livability
  • Housing affordability
  • Financing city development
  • What future for car dependent cities like Canberra?
  • Politics and city form: lessons learnt from the City of Canberra, and other Australian cities

For more information on the 9th International Urban Design Conference this November please visit the conference website.

Sponsorship – 9th International Urban Design Conference

The 9th International Urban Design Conference will be held at Hyatt Canberra from Monday 7 November to Wednesday 9 November 2016. Conference sponsorship will provide a range of benefits and raise your profile to potential clients, decision makers and key players in Urban Design.

Sponsorship benefits include:

  • Maintaining a high profile before, during and following the event.
  • Demonstrating your organisations commitment within the sector.
  • Consolidating corporate relationships and expose your staff to your key markets.
  • Enabling your organisations representatives to mix informally with industry professionals, leaders, local governance personnel, planners and speakers.
  • Sponsors and exhibitors have the opportunity to publish articles on our blog during the year, heavily promoted to over 50,000 subscribers.
  • Website advertising.
  • All Sponsors and Exhibitors are acknowledged and linked from the conference website for one year.

A vast range of sponsorship opportunities to enhance exposure of your business are now available. For more information on sponsorship or tailoring a package to meet your needs please visit the 9th International Urban Design Conference website.

Australia’s cities are green but they also have some major flaws

Australia’s major cities are in danger of becoming miserable metropolises full of unhappy residents unless more investment is made in public transport and there’s some relief from the high cost of living.

The country’s capitals are also ill prepared for natural disasters and would struggle to cope in the face of a major terrorist attack.

That’s the conclusion of an innovative study that ranked 100 of the world’s cities according to how they fared when it came to social, economic and environmental factors — or, as the research lists them — people, profit and planet.

Canberra is Australia’s happiest and most sustainable city.Source:News Corp Australia
Canberra is Australia’s happiest and most sustainable city. Source:News Corp Australia

And unlike many other surveys of global cities, the Sustainable Cities Index placed Melbourne below its archrival of Sydney.

“A lot of people get confused with sustainability being just about the environment but, by our definition, balancing immediate needs of the population without compromising the needs of tomorrow is the heart of a sustainable city,” said Greg Steele, chief executive officer of design and consultancy firm Arcadis’ Australia Pacific arm, which commissioned the research.

The world’s most sustainable city was Zurich, which scored highest on environmental metrics for being a profit centre. But it fell because of the lack of work-life balance and high prices in the Swiss city.

Singapore, Stockholm, Vienna and London were also in the top five.

Asked which global city balanced profit, planet and people most successfully, Mr Steele highlighted Canberra, which is the highest ranked Australian city and the 18th most sustainable city worldwide.

Mr Steele said the ACT’s single level of government meant things got done quickly and initiatives, such as Canberra’s new light rail, were going to keep it on top.

But just like Australia’s other major cities, a lack of affordable housing had dragged it down.

And if Canberrans think they’ve got it bad, just head up the road.

Melbourne was down the list of Australia’s most sustainable cities. Picture: Mark StewartSource:News Corp Australia
Melbourne was down the list of Australia’s most sustainable cities. Source:News Corp Australia

Despite the multitude of catastrophic events, from floods in Brisbane to bushfires on the outskirts of Melbourne, the report found dealing with disasters including possible terrorist attacks, wasn’t a priority.

In the global rankings, Sydney was the world’s 21st most sustainable city, Brisbane the 30th and Melbourne 32nd.

The harbour city’s collection of world class universities and its generally healthier population pulled it in front of Melbourne and Brisbane. The Victorian capital also scored worse on the environmental front than Sydney.

Yet last month, the Economist Intelligence Unit found Melbourne the world’s most liveable city with Sydney kicked out of the global leaderboard due to the “heightened perceived threat of terrorism”.

He also said that the Arcadis survey measured something else: happiness — or the lack of.

A successful work life balance as well as a quick commute were factors that helped residents get happy.

Read more.