PKI: Living infrastructure: Transforming an ugly duckling

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Jock Gammon, Managing Director at Junglefy who will present on ‘PKI: Living infrastructure: Transforming an ugly duckling’.

Abstract

The Manly Vale commuter car park is the world’s first “breathing” car park integrating 9,000 plants into its façade to provide living design, functionality and cleaner air. Located on Sydney’s northern beaches B-Line bus route, this car park is covered with Breathing Wall modules which have been scientifically proven to reduce air pollutants including particulate matter, C02 and volatile organic compounds.

The project is the first in the world to use rotating Breathing Wall panels that have been designed to rotate 180 degrees to allow safe access for plant maintenance. The rotating panels eliminate the need for scaffolding or ropes access and extend the application of plant walls to areas previously thought to have been too difficult to install living infrastructure.

With nearly 90% of Australia’s population located in our cities and unprecedented urban development, our trees and green space have become the trade off to our changing needs. Urban planners are tasked with the challenge of designing our cities to expand up and out whilst retaining green space and natural ecosystems. Living infrastructure provides the opportunity to include vast amounts of plants into cities in a very small imprint. Plants and green space have been shown to improve liveability, the economy, resilience and the environment.

The private sector and government have recognised the importance of plants and are leading the way with industry transformation. The Manly Vale car park was undertaken by the NSW government arising out of demand for quick and efficient transport between the city and Sydney’s northern beaches. The project will be subject to ongoing testing by UTS to prove the efficacy of the Breathing Wall in an outdoor environment and is likely to be the first of many projects to use this technology as a solution to improving health, wellbeing, noise and aesthetic.

Biography

Trained as a horticulturist with studies in Environmental Science, Jock loves plants and understands their power at making cites more liveable. As Junglefy’s Managing Director, he works with clients to ensure that living infrastructure projects can be realised in a cost effective and low risk manner. Being a natural innovator, Jock developed the award-winning ‘Breathing Wall’, an active green wall system, scientifically proven to accelerate the removal of air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. Jock continues to challenge the status quo, through investing in research and the science behind the Breathing Wall and other new technologies.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

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Plan for 6200 Homes in Sydney’s Newest Suburb

A new development precinct planned for Sydney’s north-west growth corridor is set to offer thousands of new homes to Sydneysiders.

The NSW government release of the Marsden Park North masterplan shows 6200 new homes will be built in the precinct over the next 20 years.

The masterplanned community, which will offer a mixture of housing options, sits approximately 12 kilometres from Blacktown CBD and 20 kilometres from Parramatta’s CBD.

Planning and housing minister Anthony Roberts said the plan includes three new local centres, a new primary school, 13 brand new playing fields and more useable open space proposed to benefit residents of the area.

The NSW government’s release of the masterplan proposes more than 57 hectares of parks and playing fields

“The new playing fields, public parks and the local centres will be easily accessible via new pathways and cycleways,” Roberts said.

“A wide range of homes would be provided for the diverse and growing community, easily accessed by new road upgrades and the Sydney Metro Northwest.”

Upgrades of Richmond Road, Garfield Road, Schofields Road and Bandon Road are planned to improve access to and from the development precinct.

Member for Riverstone Kevin Conolly says Marsden Park North will eventually become part of the new suburbs of Angus, Marsden Park and Vineyard.

“Residents will also have access to the new Sydney Metro Northwest at Tallawong Station as well as existing Schofields and Riverstone Railway Stations,” Conolly said.

The Sydney Metro Northwest at Tallawong Station is scheduled to open in 2019.

The Marsden Park North Masterplan is now open for local community feedback until October 26.

Join Industry Leaders at the 2018 International Urban Design Conference

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Topics will include exploring the potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts, urban design best practice, designing safety into a city, future proofing, connectivity and design quality outcomes. The conference will also explore the links which create the concrete physicality of the built environment, the complex social, economic, political and cultural processes through which the physical urban form is produced and consumed.

The conference has been held annually since 2007 in Brisbane, Sydney, Gold Coast, Canberra, Adelaide and Melbourne. Be inspired by innovations and projects that are transforming cities. This conference is an opportunity for design professionals to exchange ideas and experiences, to be creative and visionary and to contribute to redesigning our urban futures. The program aims at developing a framework of ideas to provoke debate and speculate on new forms of practice.

Conference Topics Include:

  • Potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts
  • Regulating urban design
  • Safe city design
  • Transport
  • Design quality

Featured Speakers for 2018 Include:

  • Mr Peter Poulet, NSW Government Architect, NSW Government
  • Ms Sue Weatherley, Director Strategic Outcomes and Development, City of Parramatta
  • Ms Sarah Hill, CEO, Greater Sydney Commission, NSW
  • Mr Andrew McWhinney, Manager, New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory, Intelligent Risks
  • Ms Caroline Stalker, Design Director Urban and Principal, ARUP Australasia (QLD)

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference, topics, to submit your application to present, registration and more please visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

Join us at the 11th International Urban Design Conference

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Topics will include exploring the potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts, urban design best practice, designing safety into a city, future proofing, connectivity and design quality outcomes. The conference will also explore the links which create the concrete physicality of the built environment, the complex social, economic, political and cultural processes through which the physical urban form is produced and consumed.

The conference has been held annually since 2007 in Brisbane, Sydney, Gold Coast, Canberra, Adelaide and Melbourne. Be inspired by innovations and projects that are transforming cities. This conference is an opportunity for design professionals to exchange ideas and experiences, to be creative and visionary and to contribute to redesigning our urban futures. The program aims at developing a framework of ideas to provoke debate and speculate on new forms of practice.

Conference Topics Include:

  • Potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts
  • Regulating urban design
  • Safe city design
  • Transport
  • Design quality

Featured Speakers for 2018 Include:

  • Mr Peter Poulet, NSW Government Architect, NSW Government
  • Ms Sue Weatherley, Director Strategic Outcomes and Development, City of Parramatta
  • Ms Sarah Hill, CEO, Greater Sydney Commission, NSW
  • Mr Andrew McWhinney, Manager, New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory, Intelligent Risks
  • Ms Caroline Stalker, Design Director Urban and Principal, ARUP Australasia (QLD)

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference, topics, to submit your application to present, registration and more please visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

Local government eyes social media for feedback

Work is underway on a new digital platform that will enable councils to capture and analyse conversations on social media as a means of improving community consultation on major projects.

The study involving two councils and a team of urban planners, policy experts and data analysts aims to ensure the “citizen voice” helps to drive smart city initiatives.

NSW’s City of Canada Bay and Queensland’s Logan City Council are participating in the project being led by the University of Sydney’s Smart Urbanism Lab and supported by the Commonwealth’s Smart Cities and Suburbs Program.

While there is sometimes a perception that smart city initiatives are led by technology, Dr Tooran Alizadeh, director of urban design at Sydney University’s school of architecture, said the project aimed to find a new way of “crowd sourcing” opinion on key local government initiatives.

“The conversations about the hot urban projects of the day are already happening in the public online domain, and we are essentially gathering them, categorising them and feeding them back to local governments,” she told Government News.

Sydney University’s Smart Urbanism Lab is leading the project.

The project, which involves the development of algorithms and tools to capture this information, will produce two dashboards – one for local government and one for the public.

“The fact we’re now building the citizen voice means we have a responsibility to feed that back to the public and tell people we heard them… it’s useful for individual members of the community to know the diversity of opinion,” Dr Alizadeh said.

The study will scrutinise social media feedback around two key projects for each of the participating local governments: Cronulla Park and the Yarrabilba development for Logan, and Parramatta Road and Five Dock for Canada Bay.

The dashboard will be fed by the live conversations happening on Twitter and Facebook, as well as those captured in reader comments on news sites’ coverage of the projects.

“It will be useful on two levels,” Dr Alizadeh said.

“The first is the live conversation which is important if they have a sudden issue or problem. The second is a longitudinal benefit because the longer we collect the data the more we will hopefully be able to make sense of the things that trigger reactions over the life of a project,” she said.

People’s attitudes towards urban projects and issues are usually dynamic, “so the only way we can make sense of them and how they change is if you keep an eye on it over a longer period,” she said.

Dr Alizadeh said the project would utilise the diverse skillset within the newly established Smart Urbanism Lab, which has staff expertise in urban planning, geography, policy making and big data.

An early version of the dashboard is expected in the next two to three months for the participating local governments to comment on, while the project is slated to conclude next May.

Logan City Council’s innovation committee chairperson, councillor Laurie Smith said social media presented a new opportunity to increase the reach of community consultation on planning and development.

“This gives residents another option to have their say on how their city develops and to feel included in council decision making,” she said.

Originally Published by Government News, continue reading here.