City Temperatures and City Economics, a Hidden Relationship Between Sun and Wind and Profits

Urban design undoubtedly influences the urban economy.

A simple thing like designing an area to make it more walkable can boost local business profits. This can also increase real estate value, create more and better jobs and generate stronger local economies. Street temperatures also determine their walkability. With climate change bringing longer and more frequent heatwaves, street temperatures will become even higher than at present. This will reduce walkability and, in turn, local business profitability.

Walkability impacts local businesses

The evidence shows businesses do better with foot traffic than car-based mobility. For example, closing New York’s Times Square to cars increased business revenue by 71% during an eight-month pilot project in 2009. The following example helps explain why foot traffic benefits local business. In car-based cities, a take-away coffee on the way to work may involve a series of decisions:
  1. driving the car to a certain cafe
  2. finding car parking
  3. leaving and closing the car
  4. joining a queue to buy a coffee
  5. getting back in the car
  6. proceeding on the journey to work.
In contrast, when walking down the street we may not even have considered having a coffee, but we can smell it. So:
  1. we walk into the cafe
  2. join the queue to buy a coffee
  3. carry on walking to work.
The process is shorter, more spontaneous and part of a daily journey. Impulse buys as a result of exposure to stimuli have surprisingly big economic consequences, particularly for the retail industry.

What is microclimate?

Microclimate refers to the atmospheric conditions in an area. These can vary not only from the surrounding region but also within the area itself. Both the natural and built environments influence these differences. A well-known example of such differences is in Sydney’s western suburbs, which are much hotter in summer than the eastern suburbs, which benefit from being close to the sea and cooling breezes. But can an unpleasant microclimate suppress impulse buys? To a certain extent, yes. The frequency of impulse buys, and ultimately the overall success of most businesses in tropical cities, may be connected to the local microclimate. For instance, the orientation of streets in relation to sun and breeze exposure can influence the microclimate. This can then determine if people stay and have a second coffee or extra ice cream after lunch, or if they avoid streets because they are too exposed and hot. Australian cities, however, are too often overzoned and planned in a sprawling pattern. By compromising walkability this represses spontaneous purchases. CBDs are also too frequently oversized with unshaded wide streets. In hot climates this makes the journey on foot unpleasant and poses health risks to young children, senior citizens and people with health conditions. This article was originally published by The Conversation. Click here to continue reading entire article.
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PKI: Living infrastructure: Transforming an ugly duckling

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Jock Gammon, Managing Director at Junglefy who will present on ‘PKI: Living infrastructure: Transforming an ugly duckling’.

Abstract

The Manly Vale commuter car park is the world’s first “breathing” car park integrating 9,000 plants into its façade to provide living design, functionality and cleaner air. Located on Sydney’s northern beaches B-Line bus route, this car park is covered with Breathing Wall modules which have been scientifically proven to reduce air pollutants including particulate matter, C02 and volatile organic compounds.

The project is the first in the world to use rotating Breathing Wall panels that have been designed to rotate 180 degrees to allow safe access for plant maintenance. The rotating panels eliminate the need for scaffolding or ropes access and extend the application of plant walls to areas previously thought to have been too difficult to install living infrastructure.

With nearly 90% of Australia’s population located in our cities and unprecedented urban development, our trees and green space have become the trade off to our changing needs. Urban planners are tasked with the challenge of designing our cities to expand up and out whilst retaining green space and natural ecosystems. Living infrastructure provides the opportunity to include vast amounts of plants into cities in a very small imprint. Plants and green space have been shown to improve liveability, the economy, resilience and the environment.

The private sector and government have recognised the importance of plants and are leading the way with industry transformation. The Manly Vale car park was undertaken by the NSW government arising out of demand for quick and efficient transport between the city and Sydney’s northern beaches. The project will be subject to ongoing testing by UTS to prove the efficacy of the Breathing Wall in an outdoor environment and is likely to be the first of many projects to use this technology as a solution to improving health, wellbeing, noise and aesthetic.

Biography

Trained as a horticulturist with studies in Environmental Science, Jock loves plants and understands their power at making cites more liveable. As Junglefy’s Managing Director, he works with clients to ensure that living infrastructure projects can be realised in a cost effective and low risk manner. Being a natural innovator, Jock developed the award-winning ‘Breathing Wall’, an active green wall system, scientifically proven to accelerate the removal of air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter. Jock continues to challenge the status quo, through investing in research and the science behind the Breathing Wall and other new technologies.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

Plan for 6200 Homes in Sydney’s Newest Suburb

A new development precinct planned for Sydney’s north-west growth corridor is set to offer thousands of new homes to Sydneysiders.

The NSW government release of the Marsden Park North masterplan shows 6200 new homes will be built in the precinct over the next 20 years.

The masterplanned community, which will offer a mixture of housing options, sits approximately 12 kilometres from Blacktown CBD and 20 kilometres from Parramatta’s CBD.

Planning and housing minister Anthony Roberts said the plan includes three new local centres, a new primary school, 13 brand new playing fields and more useable open space proposed to benefit residents of the area.

The NSW government’s release of the masterplan proposes more than 57 hectares of parks and playing fields

“The new playing fields, public parks and the local centres will be easily accessible via new pathways and cycleways,” Roberts said.

“A wide range of homes would be provided for the diverse and growing community, easily accessed by new road upgrades and the Sydney Metro Northwest.”

Upgrades of Richmond Road, Garfield Road, Schofields Road and Bandon Road are planned to improve access to and from the development precinct.

Member for Riverstone Kevin Conolly says Marsden Park North will eventually become part of the new suburbs of Angus, Marsden Park and Vineyard.

“Residents will also have access to the new Sydney Metro Northwest at Tallawong Station as well as existing Schofields and Riverstone Railway Stations,” Conolly said.

The Sydney Metro Northwest at Tallawong Station is scheduled to open in 2019.

The Marsden Park North Masterplan is now open for local community feedback until October 26.

Join Industry Leaders at the 2018 International Urban Design Conference

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Topics will include exploring the potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts, urban design best practice, designing safety into a city, future proofing, connectivity and design quality outcomes. The conference will also explore the links which create the concrete physicality of the built environment, the complex social, economic, political and cultural processes through which the physical urban form is produced and consumed.

The conference has been held annually since 2007 in Brisbane, Sydney, Gold Coast, Canberra, Adelaide and Melbourne. Be inspired by innovations and projects that are transforming cities. This conference is an opportunity for design professionals to exchange ideas and experiences, to be creative and visionary and to contribute to redesigning our urban futures. The program aims at developing a framework of ideas to provoke debate and speculate on new forms of practice.

Conference Topics Include:

  • Potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts
  • Regulating urban design
  • Safe city design
  • Transport
  • Design quality

Featured Speakers for 2018 Include:

  • Mr Peter Poulet, NSW Government Architect, NSW Government
  • Ms Sue Weatherley, Director Strategic Outcomes and Development, City of Parramatta
  • Ms Sarah Hill, CEO, Greater Sydney Commission, NSW
  • Mr Andrew McWhinney, Manager, New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory, Intelligent Risks
  • Ms Caroline Stalker, Design Director Urban and Principal, ARUP Australasia (QLD)

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference, topics, to submit your application to present, registration and more please visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

Join us at the 11th International Urban Design Conference

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Topics will include exploring the potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts, urban design best practice, designing safety into a city, future proofing, connectivity and design quality outcomes. The conference will also explore the links which create the concrete physicality of the built environment, the complex social, economic, political and cultural processes through which the physical urban form is produced and consumed.

The conference has been held annually since 2007 in Brisbane, Sydney, Gold Coast, Canberra, Adelaide and Melbourne. Be inspired by innovations and projects that are transforming cities. This conference is an opportunity for design professionals to exchange ideas and experiences, to be creative and visionary and to contribute to redesigning our urban futures. The program aims at developing a framework of ideas to provoke debate and speculate on new forms of practice.

Conference Topics Include:

  • Potential of mixed use places, spaces and precincts/districts
  • Regulating urban design
  • Safe city design
  • Transport
  • Design quality

Featured Speakers for 2018 Include:

  • Mr Peter Poulet, NSW Government Architect, NSW Government
  • Ms Sue Weatherley, Director Strategic Outcomes and Development, City of Parramatta
  • Ms Sarah Hill, CEO, Greater Sydney Commission, NSW
  • Mr Andrew McWhinney, Manager, New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory, Intelligent Risks
  • Ms Caroline Stalker, Design Director Urban and Principal, ARUP Australasia (QLD)

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference, topics, to submit your application to present, registration and more please visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au