UD1: Including Young People in Public Spaces and Active Interfaces; Case Studies from Europe

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Tim D’Agostino, Landscape Architect with Aspect Studios who will present on ‘UD1: Including Young People in Public Spaces and Active Interfaces; Case Studies from Europe’.

Abstract

Active interfaces, that open buildings and the activities within them to the public realm, offer an ideal opportunity to bring diverse demographics and practices together. If these spaces are located within accessible areas, they can stimulate social interaction and provide learning opportunities, which seems to be particularly relevant for young people (ages 10-18). Such spaces need to be inclusive of all people, in order to inspire and encourage cultural diversity and understanding, creativity and informal mentoring from older community members.

By challenging the traditional barriers of building footprints (inside) and public realm (outside), more vibrant and resilient communities can be forged. In the lure of screen-oriented play, professions working in the urban environment have an obligation to make public spaces feel inviting and inspiring for the often disenfranchised and underrepresented generation of young people.

In this age group there are key stages of finding our place and passion in the world. In Australia we have a strong focus on designing playgrounds for children 10 and under. However, once we hit our teenage years and outgrow the playground we spend less time with our parents and more time with our friends. Together we search for new spaces to hang out in, be it shopping centres, public or privately owned spaces, somewhere local or somewhere in our capital city.

Professional experience and a study tour of European public spaces will be used to explore the question; “If we do not include, support, or enable young people to be in public spaces, how can we expect them to develop social skills, healthy cultural practices, and learn how to interact with broader society?”. Active interfaces will be explored as an opportunity to address this.

Biography

Tim D’Agostino is a Landscape Architect working for ASPECT Studios. After finishing his Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning double degree with Honours at RMIT in 2014, he has worked for multiple local councils developing Master Plans, Strategies and landscape architecture projects in both capital city and rural contexts. Tim has worked with a diversity of communities and key stakeholders to develop and deliver inclusive and considered urban design outcomes.

Tim was awarded a scholarship from Parks and Leisure Australia to undertake a study tour of Europe investigating public spaces inclusive of young people. On this study tour he discovered many precedents of communal and social hubs, rich in public life, mixed use activities and active interfaces, of which he will be presenting on. Tim in his spare time has also been a part of the Community Assembly for the Yarra River Strategic Plan and advocates for socially inclusive and sustainable public spaces.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

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D2: Over the Street, the Beach: Infrastructure and Placemaking

The upcoming 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW next month over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Thomas Rivard, Associate Director – Head of Urban Strategies at Mcgregor Coxall who will present on ‘UD2: Over the Street, the Beach: Infrastructure and Placemaking’.

Mr Thomas Rivard

Abstract

We consider three challenges when discussing urban regeneration: ecology (natural systems), infrastructure (technical networks) and community (human relationships).

Migration, growth and rapid urbanisation place Australia central to these challenges: effects on environment, urban evolution and inclusive communities. Our cities must directly confront these challenges, as synergistic links between land, infrastructure and production have established unique patterns and forms of development, while continued quality of life demands a corresponding increase in social amenity. Importantly, because of the pressures applied on landscape and its complicit ecologies within urban centres, cities must perform more progressively on environmental issues.

The contemporary city is built on a paradoxical relationship with these two existential pressures: development and environmental impacts. In response, McGregor Coxall works at two scales: the large-scale realm of regional economic development and ecosystemic operations, and the scale of the person, the street and the neighbourhood. The systemic understanding provides the contextual basis by which projects perform, both economically and environmentally, while our understanding of the needs and desires of communities and their inhabitants provide the cultural impetus to make each project unique, identifiable and a genuine product of its place.

Connecting these extremes is the infrastructure required to accommodate each. In urban regeneration projects, we identify, adapt and transform existing and new infrastructure and operations to foster evolutionary development, create innovative approaches to sustainability and afford local inhabitants’ agency in constructing their future communities.

This presentation will explore in greater detail processes of urban design and city-making that establish genuine urban resilience by drawing from local systems, whether commercial, cultural or ecological. It will be illustrated by McGregor Coxall projects that combine sustainable enterprises, cultural diversity and the re-integration of natural and man-made ecologies, creating places from the ground up, driven by strategies for urban regeneration at many scales, and at all levels.

Biography

Thomas A Rivard is an urbanist, artist and educator, engaged in a multi-disciplinary practice making cities, urban interventions, buildings, productions and fables, and bringing together diverse collaborators in the pursuit of the impossible and the improbable. His work in the fields of city making, public art, ecosystem design, performance, architecture, installation and media is dedicated to re-imagining the links between provocative cultural acts and the inhabitants of the urban environments in which they thrive. He is head of Cities Research and Innovation at McGregor Coxall where he guides the practice’s design leadership in integrating habitats, communities and infrastructure.

He is the founder of the Urban Islands program (www.urbanislands.net), a global urban workshop initiative. He teaches and lectures regularly at universities and conferences in Australia and internationally, and is currently undertaking a PhD titled Performative Urbanism, exploring the relationships between public space, urban society and narratives of heterogeneity and independence. His diverse interests in cities and the environment will see him contributing to the urban layout of the Burning Man festival this year. He has also been accepted into Al Gore’s Climate Ambassador Training program this year.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference and to secure your spot visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

 

UD1: K2K: Integrating Infrastructure Delivery with Urban Planning

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Richard Nugent, Director Urban Design at CM+ who will present on ‘UD1: K2K: Integrating Infrastructure Delivery with Urban Planning.

Abstract

How can urban renewal be managed by integrating transport infrastructure with planning to create well-designed, sustainable and liveable places?

Kensington and Kingsford town centres in Eastern Sydney are undergoing transition with the introduction of the Sydney CBD to South East Light Rail. The new infrastructure will directly impact on the centres’ identity, functionality and accessibility and has been a catalyst for considerable redevelopment pressure.

Randwick City Council has undertaken an innovative approach, including engaging CM+ to prepare the Planning Strategy for these adjacent precincts to guide change within the town centres.

Council took an innovative approach to the overall project, through implementation of a 15-year program comprising short, medium and long term planning and urban design interventions.

Council initially developed Light Rail Urban Design Guidelines to provide an overarching framework for place making and public domain improvements alongside the delivery of the light rail infrastructure.

To address the town centres’ longer-term planning needs, a strategic vision was established through an International Urban Design Competition which recently won the Greater Sydney Commission’s inaugural award in 2017 for “A Great Plan”. The competition called for fresh ideas to support the sustainable growth and rejuvenation of the town centres through high quality urban design.

The subsequent draft K2K Planning Strategy sets out the implementation actions to guide long term changes to land use, built form and the public domain. The Strategy contains measures to enhance the liveability, sustainability and economic prosperity of both town centres with a focus on design excellence and innovation.

Working via a collaborative process with Council, a best practice approach to integrating infrastructure delivery with urban planning has been established, to create well-designed and liveable places.

Winner: 2017 Planning Institute of Australia (NSW) Award | Best Planning Ideas – Small Project

Biography

Richard Nugent | Director Urban Design CM+ MArch Urban Design (Dist), Harvard University GSD, USA BArch University of Notre Dame USA Registered Architect – Registered Architect | Massachusetts, USA | Reg. No. 6948 NSW | ARB Reg. No. 9202 Member Australian Institute of Architects Member American Institute of Architects Member Planning Institute of Australia Dick is responsible for the design and management of major urban design and master planning projects at CM+.

He has local and international experience at all levels of master planning, design, documentation and construction administration on a wide range of projects, managing multidisciplinary teams throughout the design and delivery process. He is currently a design advisor to the Barangaroo Delivery Authority, is a member of the Randwick Design Excellence Panel and a member of the newly created NSW Government Architect’s State Design Review Panel. He is currently the Design Manager for NorthConnex, a major infrastructure project in northern Sydney.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

UD1: Delivering Liveable, Smart and Sustainable Urban Renewal Using Green Star Communities

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Nick Alsop, Senior Manager – Market Engagement with the Green Building Council of Australia who will present on ‘UD1: Delivering Liveable, Smart and Sustainable Urban Renewal Using Green Star Communities’.

Abstract

Cities across the country are accelerating urban renewal and infill in order to meet increased demands of population growth. This is a huge opportunity to deliver precinct scale sustainable urban design, built form and infrastructure and contributing to the pressing urban agenda of reshaping our cities to be more liveable, smart, connected and environmentally friendly. The Green Star – Communities rating tool is a framework and certification tool that is being employed to achieve and demonstrate this. This presentation will look at how this rating tool works and its application in practice.

It will look at trends in development across urban renewal as well as give an introduction to Green Star Communities, and its delivery and application in practice across different sites. Those who have not heard of the Green Star – Communities rating system will learn how it works. Those who already familiar with it will learn what opportunities might be applicable for future projects, and how it can align with a city’s social, environmental and economic goals.

Nick will draw on work from leading edge Green Star Communities projects such as Green Square, Brisbane Showgrounds, Fishermans Bend, Barangaroo and West Village to demonstrate how sustainability and liveability is being integrated into project visions and goals, spatial planning, engagement, infrastructure, placemaking, design and construction. Nick will also reflect on the future trend for sustainable precincts in Australia in response to the global and local sustainability challenges, climate change and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Biography

Nick has over 15 years experience in delivering city sustainability programs. At the GBCA he is responsible for the growth and strategy for the Green Star Communities tool, working with government and business stakeholders to apply the framework in delivering best practice sustainable precincts. Prior to this, Nick worked in a variety of sustainability roles at state and local government, including cities of Port Phillip and Melbourne, and Sustainability Victoria

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au

UD2: Meaning and Experience: Landscape Narratives for a New City Heart for the Sunshine Coast

The 2018 International Urban Design Conference will be held at the SMC Conference and Function Centre, Sydney, NSW over 12 – 13 November.

The conference will showcase innovations in projects and research embracing and creating transformational change in urban environments.

Joining us at the conference is Mr Mark Fuller, Principal Urban Design and Landscape at Tract Consultants who will present on ‘UD2: Meaning and Experience: Landscape Narratives for a New City Heart for the Sunshine Coast’.

Abstract

The Maroochydore City Centre is being developed on the site of the former Horton Park golf course on the Sunshine Coast.
The re-stitching of the 53 Ha site with the fabric of the existing urban area will physically and conceptually reshape the City, providing a new heart for the “Central Business District for the 21st Century”: a focus for investment and community growth.

With over 40% of the site being developed over the next 20 years as open space, a strong design strategy for the public realm is critical in underpinning this ambition, guiding the creation of a new landscape and family of urban places which can evolve alongside, and be enriched by, the community as it grows.

A key pillar of the strategy has been the discovery and articulation of a unique identity and narrative for the public realm. As a site which has been extensively modified from its natural, low lying wetland character, a different paradigm was needed which could guide the design towards a renewed relationship with the landscape of the region.

The resulting design strategy explores the notion of the regional landscape as an ancient place that has been shaped and moulded by the elements, continually changing and adapting seasonally and over time, where it is possible to experience both drama and intimacy, and where water and the coastal environment permeate the community’s association with the region they love.
The proposed character is therefore derived from an exploration of aspects of the Sunshine Coast landscape which can provide analogies to the forms, materials and spatial character within the site, built on a platform of endemic and tested materials.

The aim is for a distinctive, recognisable and beautiful public realm and landscape that is responsive to its location and reflective of the wider region.

Biography

Mark Fuller FAILA AIA CMLI RIBA Mark has over 35 years professional experience, having worked extensively throughout Australia and internationally in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and the US. He is a registered landscape architect in Australia and the UK, and an architect (United Kingdom). Mark’s work has focussed on the creative fusion of built form and the landscape, and the design of unique and memorable places. He has been responsible for the master planning and delivery of the public realm for new and existing urban environments and in the integration of new development in sensitive landscapes and communities. He was on the Sunshine Coast Urban Design Advisory Panel for 10 years, and has served on the Queensland State Board for Urban Places, and is a former National President of the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects.

For more information on the 2018 International Urban Design Conference visit the conference website at urbandesignaustralia.com.au