Kangaroo Point ‘Buildings That Breathe’ To Drive Brisbane As New World City: CEO

Two stunning 18-storey ‘self breathing’ residential towers have been proposed at 23- 31 Ferry Street and 16- 30 Prospect Street Kangaroo Point across 3048sqm, metres from the Story Bridge.

102 residential units have been proposed across the two 18 level buildings, including 40 two-bedroom and 62 three-bedroom apartments – representing the majority at 59 per cent of the unit mix.

Four penthouse apartments – each with their own rooftop pool – are also included.

According to application documents, the majority of the proposed apartments are naturally ventilated – including communal spaces – with zero single aspect south-facing apartment proposed. The development will feature a private landscaped roof garden, gymnasium, pool, restaurants, cafes and resident lounge.

The documents state that the landscaping proposed – capable of efficient and effective maintenance – will future-proof landscaping.

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Founder and CEO Tony Leung of A+ Design Group – leader of the team behind the project – said the architecture of the Kangaroo Point development would contribute to Brisbane presenting itself as a ‘New World City’.

“The team at a+  share the Mayor’s vision for Brisbane to become Australia’s New World City. Early on, we identified that this New World City needs aspirational architecture, architecture that not only embodies the tropical climate of South East Queensland and represents a sense of place but also, responds  to its site and provides an appropriate response to the evolution of the Brisbane Skyline.  So that was a key driver and starting point for the concept. We wanted the articulation of the façade to be playful, so we looked into examples of treehouse architecture.  Out of this process, we proposed a series of platforms set amongst the branches and canopies of greenery which forms a softer, more gentle response and  juxtaposition to the glass and steel city across the river.”

Originally Published by The Urban Developer, continue reading here.

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Virtual Reality Tool Helps Architects Create Dementia-Friendly Spaces

A virtual reality device has been launched that will help architects and designers create dementia-friendly buildings and spaces by mimicking the visual impairments experienced by dementia patients.

The invention is a market first for architectural design and will be known as Virtual Reality Empathy Platform (VR-EP). It stems from the knowledge that people with dementia can see things very differently, with objects often appearing dimmer and less colourful than they really are which can lead to fright and confusion.

The appearance of a room without and with the Virtual Reality Empathy Platform headset, for a dementia sufferer.
The appearance of a room without and with the Virtual Reality Empathy Platform headset, for a dementia sufferer.

The technology can be used in the design of new buildings such as care homes, hospitals or sheltered housing, and also has the potential to assess existing buildings and environments. Dementia-friendly design can significantly improve the quality of life for people living with the condition.

Originally Published by The Urban Developer, continue reading here.

West End Apartments: An Architectural Design Melbourne Can Be Proud Of

The first apartments have been revealed in the ‘world-class mixed-use retail, residential and leisure precinct’, West End – a project with an architectural design Melbourne can use to remake its West into its own buzzing Brooklyn.

Designed by leading interiors group Carr Design Group is the ‘Adderley’, which comprises of 100 one, two and three bedroom apartments and penthouses that are considered to be the precinct’s most luxurious and most expensive residences.

Located in West End’s tallest building, spanning 15 levels, the residences boast picture perfect views of the local property in the CBD and Docklands, with oversized floor plans to offer comfortable living and extra high ceilings in the tower apartments.

“The Adderley brings the high end bespoke design we are known for in residential arenas to an apartment setting, creating a truly unique and unexpected home,” Carr Design Group director Sue Carr said.

“The local market is craving something interesting, detailed, classic and timeless but also adventurous and edgy. We looked to the Italian masters and were inspired by bold geometric forms when designing the Adderley.”

West End is currently one of the biggest development projects with prolific architectural design in Melbourne and will remake a 9200 square metre former industrial site into a pulsating hub for living, playing, staying and working. It was designed as a self-sustaining community and combines exemplary residential living across four boutique apartment buildings with the service of an on-site hotel, and the convenience of a myriad of retail and hospitality options, all complemented by extensive private and public relaxation zones.trenerry-property_west-end_in05_adderley_tower_living_620x380

Originally Published by The Urban Developer, continue reading here.

This Incredible Skyscraper Is Actually A Vertical Forest

Nanjing Green Towers isn’t your average skyscraper, you see it’s actually Asia’s first vertical forest.

The idea behind a vertical forest is simple: You essentially turn a building into a giant living breathing air filter, helping to clear the air pollution that often comes hand in hand with city living.

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It’s a truly astonishing piece of architecture, you see dotted along its facades are 600 tall trees, 500 medium-sized trees while a staggering 2,500 plants and shrubs then cover a 6,000sqm area.

Not only does this increase biodiversity in the local area but it will be able to absorb some 25 tonnes of CO2 every year while producing some 60kg of oxygen every day. As our cities have grown exponentially it has become clear that new buildings have to take a different approach.

We can no longer just build boxes that contain humans, we have to build ecosystems. Designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti, Nanjing Green Towers will be the first vertical forest in Asia.  This will be the third vertical forest project by the architecture firm after they completed their first building in Milan and then a second project in Switzerland.

Originally Published by The Huffington Post, continue reading here.

Why Australia Needs Greener Cities

Higher density urban living has become a primary concern for urban planners, who grapple with issues such as infrastructure development, traffic management and housing solutions. But beyond these physical concerns, there are a number of very real human issues that also need to be addressed by planners as well as developers and architects.

For all of its benefits, city living isolates people from the natural world, and new research is finding that this isolation affects the wellbeing of urbanites. With some clever design thinking, however, we can create cities that are more sustainable and offer a higher quality of life.

As cities grow, it’s easy for green spaces to become an afterthought in the planning process. This is not just the case in public spaces, but also in the development of residential and commercial projects.

Parkroyal on Pickering, Singapore
Parkroyal on Pickering, Singapore

Many city councils now have limited regulations in place specifying how much green space a new building should deliver, but going above and beyond this will have a positive impact on the environment, wellbeing of residents, the liveability of the property and its resale value.

In the last week alone there has been a great deal of public discussion over the design of apartment buildings in Brisbane, after research by Associate Professor Rosemary Kennedy from QUT’s Design Lab found that many new developments are too hot for the city’s sub-tropical climate.

Due to the excessive heat generated from their glass facades, these building require a higher amount of air-conditioning for temperature regulation.

“One of my major concerns is that we’re not designing our buildings using good design; we’re using electricity to solve design problems,” she said in an interview with ABC News.

She believes that as buyers become aware of these design issues, resale prices will suffer and tenant turnover rates will increase.

Building our cities without any regard for climate regulation contributes to the urban heat island effect, which negatively impacts the liveability of a city. This effect occurs when building materials such as concrete, glass and bitumen absorb and hold on to heat and, as a result, increase the temperature of a city.

By incorporating plants into buildings through rooftop gardens or green walls, however, we can begin to offset this effect and cool the structure, in turn reducing the need for air-conditioning.

If we were to create enough green spaces to cool Australia’s cities by eight degrees, it is estimated that the reduced use of air-conditioning alone will lower carbon emissions by 12–15 percent each year.

One Central Park, Sydney
One Central Park, Sydney

Integrating plants into city buildings is also an effective way to absorb stormwater runoff and reduce the noise levels experienced within office and apartment buildings.

These benefits are in addition to the well-known role trees play in filtering the air by soaking pollutants. So what seems like a simple element of city design can have a big impact on sustainable living and the practicality of a building.

It’s not just the environment that benefits from the practice of biophilic design – human health and mental wellbeing improves too. A recent 2009 Dutch study found that those who live less than 1km from green space had lower incidence of 15 diseases including depression, heart disease, diabetes and asthma.

Here at home, 83 percent of Australians relate relaxation and time out with green spaces, and 73 percent see their garden as a place to improve their mental wellbeing.

It is believed that this inherently positive association with nature lowers stress and anxiety levels, contributing to improved mental and physical wellbeing. Given this association, buyers are willing to pay more for a feeling of connection with nature.

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